Some new ways to Make extra income

Some Great & Creative Ways to Make Money

As you might suspect, many of these unique ways to make money involve the internet — but not all of them. Some are one-off ways to pocket some cash, while others are decent-paying jobs. A few ideas have the potential to generate huge profits.

 

There are always new ways to make money — get some ideas delivered straight to your inbox with The Penny Hoarder Daily!

 

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If a job, business or investment requires you to toil away at a stuffy corporate office to make your dough, you won’t find it here. This list consists only of creative ways you can make money. Leaving your house is optional.

 

Online Jobs

image_0

Getty Images

Have an internet connection? You’re all set to try these jobs. (To apply to fresh gigs you can do from your computer, be sure to check out our work-from-home jobs portal.)

 

1. Work for a Call Center

Customer-service jobs are common with companies that hire at-home workers. You typically spend your days responding to customers over the phone, via email or through instant messages. Tracking trends in customer complaints and questions are a large part of these roles as well.

 

Since the employers vary dramatically, you may find yourself fielding questions about deliveries and shipments or giving details about products and services.

 

Companies that frequently hire these types of jobs include AAA, American Express and Apple — as well as several other companies that don’t start with the letter A.

 

2. Be a Transcriptionist

To make money as a transcriptionist, you need to listen well and type fast. You’ll listen to audio files of varying quality and type out what you hear perfectly.

 

Transcriptionists can make up to $25 per hour. To land a job, apply with these companies that frequently hire remote transcriptionists: Allegis Transcription, NetTranscripts, TransPerfect and Rev.com.

 

Basic requirements include:

 

A computer and headset

Native English fluency

The ability to type with high accuracy at 80 or more words per minute

Some companies also require (or supply) transcribers with a foot pedal that controls audio speed, rewinding and fast forwarding.

 

To test your typing speed, several companies rely on TypingTest.com.

 

Not sure you want to do the typing yourself? Consider being a transcript proofreader, which is someone who reviews transcripts (usually courtroom and legal documents) for grammar and spelling errors.

 

These proofreading positions range from entry-level to post-graduate, depending on the material. U.S. Legal Support hires transcript proofreaders nationwide, as does ProofreadingPal.

 

To dip your feet into the field before committing to a professional project, check out Transcribe Anywhere and Proofread Anywhere for tips, ecourses and hands-on practice.

 

3. Be a Virtual Assistant

As a virtual assistant, you might answer calls, send email, prepare reports or do any number of other tasks for busy executives and business owners. It’s a lot like an online secretarial position.

 

You can list your services on freelance sites like CloudPeeps, Fiverr, Upwork, Guru or Freelancer, or you can get a job with a virtual assistant company like Zirtual.

 

Base requirements for jobs at Zirtual include:

 

Some administrative or equivalent college experience

Tech savviness, including proficiency with G Suite and other email software

Typing skills (50 words per minute or more)

Online Businesses

Woman creating online content

Getty Images

If you’d rather run your own show, you’ve got a lot of options.

 

4. Design Websites

Web designers can expect to take home an average of $49,000 per year, according to Payscale. It’s tough to get to that point if you’re freelancing, but plenty of sites exist to help you to build up your clientele.

 

TopTal pays top dollar for design pros, but be warned: The company boasts that it only hires the top 3% of freelancers.

 

If you’re not yet ready for the big leagues, try sharpening your skills by signing up and accepting clients from these freelance websites:

 

Freelancer: A freelance marketplace where both workers and employers can create listings and specify hourly rates.

Upwork: The largest freelance platform in the world and another marketplace for freelancers in any industry.

Gigster: An on-demand software development website that offers freelance work to designers, developers and product managers.

Guru: A site where freelancers can bid on projects and jobs posted by employers. Employers can also reach out directly to freelancers.

5. Create Podcasts

When you create podcasts, you can sell them or use them as an advertising platform. Either way, try to provide an interesting and/or useful series of podcasts. This post outlines how to start a podcast to become the next Serial.

 

You can make money through several methods; advertising is the most common. Once you amass a decent amount of listeners, you can attract advertisers who will pay to be featured in your podcast, usually in the form of native ads — ads within the podcast, usually read directly by the host. (Nothing like listening to 99% Invisible’s Roman Mars rave about his Casper mattress.)

 

You may also charge a monthly subscription fee (usually between $5 and $15) or crowdsource funding directly from your listeners on websites like Patreon, Go Fund Me or Indiegogo.

 

It’s probably best to incorporate an all-of-the-above approach.

 

6. Create and Sell Courses

Are you a self-taught coder with a knack for simplifying instructions? You could create an online course about it. Maybe you’re an expert at finger-picking techniques on acoustic guitar; you could make a course about that, too.

 

If you’re good at explaining whatever it is you specialize in, people out there are eager to learn, and with Udemy, you can create and host online courses — no master’s degree required.

 

Nick Loper made $4,000 in the first few months of his Udemy class for small-business owners. He wrote our guide on how to make an online course and sell it.

 

7. Freelance Online

Whether you’re good at math or marketing, you can sell your services online. Plenty of sites will pay you for just about anything, but you have to be wary of scams.

 

This post outlines some of the best freelance websites — including nDash for writers, Gigster for techies and PeoplePerHour for experts in just about any field.

 

You can sign up on the sites for free, and they can earn you a quick buck or a longtime client. And don’t worry, we vetted them, too.

 

Other Ways to Make Money Online

Woman working from home with kittens

Aileen Perilla/The Penny Hoarder

We’ve only scratched the surface of ways to make money online.

 

8. Be an Online Mock Juror

A mock or surrogate juror reviews evidence and renders a decision to help lawyers prepare for real cases. Participation usually requires a full day cooped up in a hotel conference room.

 

Fortunately, there are online surrogate juror options, too: eJury and OnlineVerdict. Those opportunities pay $5 to $60, but they can take less than an hour.

 

To qualify as an online juror, applicants must be:

 

A U.S. citizen

18 years or older

Free of any past felony convictions

Creating an account for either site above is free but will require a questionnaire that will ask very personal questions about your age, marital status, criminal history, income, political opinions and more.

 

9. Answer Questions

“Where do babies come from?”

 

Are you a linguist who can satisfy the curiosity of a 7-year-old? Or a board-certified gynecologist who can detail the complex inner workings of the reproductive system?

 

Each is an expert in their own way.

 

A number of websites will pay you to answer people’s questions. It’s as simple as that. Try JustAnswer.com to see if you qualify as an expert.

 

Creating an account on JustAnswer requires three steps:

 

Selecting your expertise category (as many as you want).

 

Uploading your resume, experience and education.

 

Submitting credentials, if needed. (Not all fields require licenses or degrees.)

 

After you submit your application, you’ll have to wait five to 10 business days for be vetted and accepted. Experts can answer as many questions as they want.

 

While rates range depending on your qualifications and how many questions you answer, the site says top earners in each category make thousands of dollars per month.

 

And even if you don’t qualify as an expert, you could refer one for a $50 gift card to Amazon.

 

10. Flip Domain Names

When it comes to domain names, websites are a lot like real estate.

 

Brent Cumberford is an online entrepreneur who’s made hundreds of thousands of dollars buying and selling websites.

 

“Just like houses and apartment buildings, online real estate comes down to ‘location, location, location,’” Cumberford told The Penny Hoarder.

 

He recommended buying .com website names instead of .org or .net. Once you have a good domain name in mind, buying it is simple. Go to a website hosting company like Namecheap or GoDaddy to see if your desired domain name is available.

 

Once you purchase it, you can reach out to potential businesses directly or use Flippa, a business marketplace, to find a buyer.

 

11. Get Paid to Watch TV

Among all the fun ways to make money, this one really takes the cake. You can actually get paid to watch TV.

 

For example, HowToWatch hires people to watch 100 hours of TV for $2,000. It requires some intense focus and note-taking, but hey, it’s money. For watching TV.

 

To snag this dream job, apply during an open application period. If you’re accepted, you’ll have about a month to binge on 100 hours of TV and keep a scorecard that tracks buffer speeds, load times and picture quality.

 

If that sounds like too much for you, the app Swagbucks also pays you to watch videos and TV from your smartphone. For each task completed, you’ll earn points, aka Swagbucks, which you can cash out for gift cards between $5 and $25.

 

12. Take Surveys

You really can make money doing online surveys. There are several legitimate paid survey sites out there to earn you some quick cash.

 

When you sign up for Swagbucks, you’ll earn an extra $5 toward a gift card if you complete a certain amount of surveys or tasks within 60 days.

 

InboxDollars is another paid survey site that could net you up to $5 per survey (though it’s usually closer to 50 cents).

 

13. Work on Mechanical Turk

Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform lets you complete small tasks online for a price.

 

According to Michael Naab, who wrote our guide (and a book) on making money with Mechanical Turk, you can expect to earn around $6 to $12 an hour doing Human Intelligence Tasks (HITs) on the platform. HITs range anywhere from completing surveys to Excel spreadsheet tasks to audio transcription.

 

14. Test Websites

Websites should be very user-friendly — so easy to use that an intoxicated person should be able to navigate it.

 

User experience consultant Richard Littauer took that idea very seriously. He started “The User Is Drunk,” a business where he tested people’s websites after drinking too much beer. And his idea took off.

 

“I raised my price for reviews from $50 to $500 very quickly,” Littauer told The Penny Hoarder, “hoping that people would stop buying so that I didn’t have to be drunk permanently.”

 

To get a steady stream of jobs, you may have to be creative like Littauer and build up your client base. For a shot at getting more assignments, sign up with websites like UserTesting and TryMyUI.

 

15. Be a Search Engine Evaluator

It’s scary how good Google’s search algorithm is becoming, but it’s not perfect… yet. Neither are other search engines, such as Yahoo or Bing.

 

To fix those flaws and make search results more relevant, companies like Appen and Lionbridge frequently hire search engine evaluators as independent contractors. Positions are typically part time, with hourly rates up to $15.

 

No previous experience is required — just tech savviness and a laptop or Android smartphone. For open positions, check Appen and Lionbridge’s career portal.

 

Using Your Home to Make Money

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Chris Zuppa/The Penny Hoarder.

Your home likely costs you a fair amount of money, so it’s time to enlist its help to earn that money back.

 

16. List a Room With Airbnb

Have a spare room? May as well try to earn some money by listing it on Airbnb

 

If you’re a good host with a desirable space, you could add hundreds — even thousands — of dollars to your savings account with Airbnb.

 

A few simple steps can make the difference between a great experience and a less-than-satisfactory one. We talked to Terence Michael, an Airbnb superhost based in Los Angeles.

 

Here are some of his tips:

 

Break out the labelmaker. “I have the entire house loaded with labels,” Michael says. “They look nice; they’re modern. This helps people feel less helpless.”

Be a good host and stock your place with the toiletries you’d expect at a hotel — toilet paper, soap and towels. Here’s a little hack from Michael: “I order on Amazon and have it delivered when people are there.”

Be kind to your neighbors. “I say, ‘I’m not going to put anyone here who I think won’t be good for you,’” Michael explains. “And I turn a lot of big groups away, especially in Nashville. I don’t want anyone going to the cops or the city.”

(Hosting laws vary from city to city. Please understand the rules and regulations applicable to your city and listing.)

 

17. Rent Your Yard for RV and Boat Storage

People need a place to put their boats and recreational vehicles during the off-season, which spells profit for you if you have the space. Your home insurance policy probably won’t cover damage, so you might have to add additional liability insurance (and check those local ordinances again).

 

Once your insurance is in shape, find a storage-space website and create a listing. While it’s possible to list your storage space on sites like Craigslist or on Facebook marketplaces, other alternatives are dedicated to RV or boat storage. One example is Neighbor.

 

Making a listing on Neighbor is free. You can set the rules and the price. Once you find a client, the agreed-upon amount will automatically be paid to you monthly (minus a 3% fee from the site). Regardless if the client misses a payment, Neighbor will pay out the full listing price.

 

It’s a win-win. You’ve got the space, and your neighbor won’t have to spend thousands of dollars on a storage facility.

 

18. Rent a Parking Spot

If you live in a large city or any town that occasionally hosts busy events, you can put out a sign and rent your driveway. Or you can rent out your parking space online using JustPark.

 

To register your parking space with JustPark, you must first create an account and answer questions about the spot. Is it a covered location? Can it fit only compact cars? Is it street parking or a driveway? Then you’re free to list your parking space as an “instant” spot (available right now) or take reservations whenever you’d like.

 

Writing Jobs

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Carmen Mandato/The Penny Hoarder

Are you a wordsmith? Put those writing skills to work to earn extra cash.

 

19. Get a Book Published

The publishing industry has changed. More than ever, a writer is expected to be the primary marketer of his or her books. That means the work isn’t over once you send the manuscript off to the presses (or inDesign). Now you have to promote it on social media and on book tours and earn solid book reviews.

 

That’s why most authors opt for ebooks and self-publishing through the Kindle Direct Publishing program, which is free. It’s possible to make money with your ebook even if you give it away.

 

Author Steve Gillman makes hundreds of dollars a month in passive income from his ebooks on Kindle Direct Publishing. In his guide to ebook publishing for The Penny Hoarder, he said it’s best to price your ebooks between $2.99 and $9.99.

 

Since Amazon gives you 70% royalties (which is good compared to publishing firms), it’s best to stick to a low price so most people can afford it.

 

20. Be a Copywriter or Editor

Content sites hire freelancers to write and edit articles. You have to work fast to make money on these sites, since you may earn less than 3 cents per word. Low pay aside, they are great for beginning freelancers to make some cash and get some experience.

 

In our list of the best freelance websites, which includes Upwork, Fiverr, Freelancer and Guru, we included several writer-focused sites that pay between $30 and $200 per article.

 

21. Write for Blogs

Blogs typically pay more than content sites. Many blogs pay $100 per post, but many writers are also trying to get those assignments.

 

Usually, blogs aren’t big businesses, and bloggers can’t afford Indeed listings, so it takes a little digging to find paying gigs.

 

Fortunately, several websites specialize in these types of jobs. Try these aggregators:

 

WriteJobs.info: a no-frills job listing site tailored for writers and editors. The free version is more than enough to snag a few clients, but a paid version is available if you donate $5 a month.

ProBlogger.com: a one-stop-shop for budding bloggers. Beyond listing a steady stream of jobs for writers, photographers and editors, ProBlogger has a ton of free resources for new writers, podcasts, ebooks and courses.

AllFreelanceWriting.com: a curated list of writing jobs that are paid directly from the client listed. Each job includes a pay rating from “LOW RATE” to “PRO RATE.”

As with all odd jobs, use your spidey sense when applying. Don’t do work for free or give sensitive information like your Social Security number up front.

 

22. Become an Affiliate Marketer

Affiliate marketing is simple in theory: Write emails, blog articles or comments that contain links to sponsored products, and when people use your coded link to visit and buy something, you make a commission.

 

Our sponsored posts at The Penny Hoarder are such examples of big-name affiliate marketing partnerships.

 

To get your feet wet, you can start making money as an affiliate partner at Amazon and earn up to 10% on e-commerce purchases that you linked to.

 

23. Write Slogans

Several websites will pay you to write slogans for companies. Some pay cash for each slogan (Freelancer and Fiverr, for example), while other sites host contests in which you can earn big bucks for the winning creation.

 

Slogan Slingers is one such site that’s completely free for copywriters to sign up and start writing slogans. Winning entries earn up to $999 (minus a 15% service fee) and are paid out via PayPal, which is required to register.

 

24. Get Paid to Write Greeting Cards

Some of the highest pay-per-word rates out there for writers aren’t in the New Yorker. They’re in the greeting-card industry.

 

Writing greeting cards could earn you hundreds of dollars for as little as five or ten words. But they have to be funny, clever or insightful, says Nicky Burton, founder of Calypso Cards.

 

“They really do have to be original,” Burton told The Penny Hoarder. “They have to have something fresh. We can’t keep going back to ‘gray hair’ and ‘over the hill.’”

 

To get started, you can pitch your ideas to Blue Mountain Arts or SNAFU designs. If they like your pitch, they’ll pay you $300 and $100 per idea, respectively.

 

So get writing, and be creative.

 

25. Enter Writing Contests

Many writing contests pay cash prizes. Some pay more than $1,000 for first place and also award a publishing contract. A few pay prizes of $5,000 to $10,000.

 

If you’re a poet, submit to Poetry Nook, which holds weekly contests that pay $50 for the winning poems. You can also submit to several magazines and publications for free if you want to get paid for creative writing.

 

26. Write Resumes (and Cover Letters)

Some people just hate writing, and they hate resume writing in particular. You can help them put their resumes together using free resume makers online. And after reading our guide on how to write a resume, you’ll be an expert.

 

Some people charge as little as $20 to do this, but others charge upwards of $800 a pop.

 

In 2014, Charmaine Pocek quit her day job to write resumes and cover letters on Fiverr. A couple years later, she became the first U.S. millionaire on the site.

 

When Pocek was starting out, she told The Penny Hoarder that she charged her clients as little as $5. Now she charges up to $800 for resume, cover-letter and LinkedIn profile services.

 

Since Pocek has the resume market on Fiverr cornered, you may want to give other resume-writing services a shot. Talent Inc. frequently hires resume writers. No professional experience is required to qualify, but you will need to be a master of Microsoft Word.

 

27. Write for Revenue-Sharing Sites

Among the websites that pay for articles, the revenue-sharing ones are the easiest to break into — sites like Dotdash, HubPages and ShoutMeLoud.

 

These sites don’t require you to be a well-renowned author per se. You can pen as many articles as you want, and if they generate revenue (aka clicks, views, sales or shares), you’ll get a part of it.

 

Some sites pay you 70% of what they make from your work, while others pay per view or comment. Either way, if nobody reads your article, you make nothing. But, hey, at least you still get a byline. If you’re a beginning freelance writer, those can really bolster your portfolio.

 

28. Write Reviews

If you have a website or blog, you could connect with companies willing to pay for product reviews. For example, at SocialSpa53 Creative Ways to Make Money

As you might suspect, many of these unique ways to make money involve the internet — but not all of them. Some are one-off ways to pocket some cash, while others are decent-paying jobs. A few ideas have the potential to generate huge profits.

 

There are always new ways to make money — get some ideas delivered straight to your inbox with The Penny Hoarder Daily!

 

Email

 

PRIVACY POLICY

 

If a job, business or investment requires you to toil away at a stuffy corporate office to make your dough, you won’t find it here. This list consists only of creative ways you can make money. Leaving your house is optional.

 

Online Jobs

image_0

Getty Images

Have an internet connection? You’re all set to try these jobs. (To apply to fresh gigs you can do from your computer, be sure to check out our work-from-home jobs portal.)

 

1. Work for a Call Center

Customer-service jobs are common with companies that hire at-home workers. You typically spend your days responding to customers over the phone, via email or through instant messages. Tracking trends in customer complaints and questions are a large part of these roles as well.

 

Since the employers vary dramatically, you may find yourself fielding questions about deliveries and shipments or giving details about products and services.

 

Companies that frequently hire these types of jobs include AAA, American Express and Apple — as well as several other companies that don’t start with the letter A.

 

2. Be a Transcriptionist

To make money as a transcriptionist, you need to listen well and type fast. You’ll listen to audio files of varying quality and type out what you hear perfectly.

 

Transcriptionists can make up to $25 per hour. To land a job, apply with these companies that frequently hire remote transcriptionists: Allegis Transcription, NetTranscripts, TransPerfect and Rev.com.

 

Basic requirements include:

 

A computer and headset

Native English fluency

The ability to type with high accuracy at 80 or more words per minute

Some companies also require (or supply) transcribers with a foot pedal that controls audio speed, rewinding and fast forwarding.

 

To test your typing speed, several companies rely on TypingTest.com.

 

Not sure you want to do the typing yourself? Consider being a transcript proofreader, which is someone who reviews transcripts (usually courtroom and legal documents) for grammar and spelling errors.

 

These proofreading positions range from entry-level to post-graduate, depending on the material. U.S. Legal Support hires transcript proofreaders nationwide, as does ProofreadingPal.

 

To dip your feet into the field before committing to a professional project, check out Transcribe Anywhere and Proofread Anywhere for tips, ecourses and hands-on practice.

 

3. Be a Virtual Assistant

As a virtual assistant, you might answer calls, send email, prepare reports or do any number of other tasks for busy executives and business owners. It’s a lot like an online secretarial position.

 

You can list your services on freelance sites like CloudPeeps, Fiverr, Upwork, Guru or Freelancer, or you can get a job with a virtual assistant company like Zirtual.

 

Base requirements for jobs at Zirtual include:

 

Some administrative or equivalent college experience

Tech savviness, including proficiency with G Suite and other email software

Typing skills (50 words per minute or more)

Online Businesses

Woman creating online content

Getty Images

If you’d rather run your own show, you’ve got a lot of options.

 

4. Design Websites

Web designers can expect to take home an average of $49,000 per year, according to Payscale. It’s tough to get to that point if you’re freelancing, but plenty of sites exist to help you to build up your clientele.

 

TopTal pays top dollar for design pros, but be warned: The company boasts that it only hires the top 3% of freelancers.

 

If you’re not yet ready for the big leagues, try sharpening your skills by signing up and accepting clients from these freelance websites:

 

Freelancer: A freelance marketplace where both workers and employers can create listings and specify hourly rates.

Upwork: The largest freelance platform in the world and another marketplace for freelancers in any industry.

Gigster: An on-demand software development website that offers freelance work to designers, developers and product managers.

Guru: A site where freelancers can bid on projects and jobs posted by employers. Employers can also reach out directly to freelancers.

5. Create Podcasts

When you create podcasts, you can sell them or use them as an advertising platform. Either way, try to provide an interesting and/or useful series of podcasts. This post outlines how to start a podcast to become the next Serial.

 

You can make money through several methods; advertising is the most common. Once you amass a decent amount of listeners, you can attract advertisers who will pay to be featured in your podcast, usually in the form of native ads — ads within the podcast, usually read directly by the host. (Nothing like listening to 99% Invisible’s Roman Mars rave about his Casper mattress.)

 

You may also charge a monthly subscription fee (usually between $5 and $15) or crowdsource funding directly from your listeners on websites like Patreon, Go Fund Me or Indiegogo.

 

It’s probably best to incorporate an all-of-the-above approach.

 

6. Create and Sell Courses

Are you a self-taught coder with a knack for simplifying instructions? You could create an online course about it. Maybe you’re an expert at finger-picking techniques on acoustic guitar; you could make a course about that, too.

 

If you’re good at explaining whatever it is you specialize in, people out there are eager to learn, and with Udemy, you can create and host online courses — no master’s degree required.

 

Nick Loper made $4,000 in the first few months of his Udemy class for small-business owners. He wrote our guide on how to make an online course and sell it.

 

7. Freelance Online

Whether you’re good at math or marketing, you can sell your services online. Plenty of sites will pay you for just about anything, but you have to be wary of scams.

 

This post outlines some of the best freelance websites — including nDash for writers, Gigster for techies and PeoplePerHour for experts in just about any field.

 

You can sign up on the sites for free, and they can earn you a quick buck or a longtime client. And don’t worry, we vetted them, too.

 

Other Ways to Make Money Online

Woman working from home with kittens

Aileen Perilla/The Penny Hoarder

We’ve only scratched the surface of ways to make money online.

 

8. Be an Online Mock Juror

A mock or surrogate juror reviews evidence and renders a decision to help lawyers prepare for real cases. Participation usually requires a full day cooped up in a hotel conference room.

 

Fortunately, there are online surrogate juror options, too: eJury and OnlineVerdict. Those opportunities pay $5 to $60, but they can take less than an hour.

 

To qualify as an online juror, applicants must be:

 

A U.S. citizen

18 years or older

Free of any past felony convictions

Creating an account for either site above is free but will require a questionnaire that will ask very personal questions about your age, marital status, criminal history, income, political opinions and more.

 

9. Answer Questions

“Where do babies come from?”

 

Are you a linguist who can satisfy the curiosity of a 7-year-old? Or a board-certified gynecologist who can detail the complex inner workings of the reproductive system?

 

Each is an expert in their own way.

 

A number of websites will pay you to answer people’s questions. It’s as simple as that. Try JustAnswer.com to see if you qualify as an expert.

 

Creating an account on JustAnswer requires three steps:

 

Selecting your expertise category (as many as you want).

 

Uploading your resume, experience and education.

 

Submitting credentials, if needed. (Not all fields require licenses or degrees.)

 

After you submit your application, you’ll have to wait five to 10 business days for be vetted and accepted. Experts can answer as many questions as they want.

 

While rates range depending on your qualifications and how many questions you answer, the site says top earners in each category make thousands of dollars per month.

 

And even if you don’t qualify as an expert, you could refer one for a $50 gift card to Amazon.

 

10. Flip Domain Names

When it comes to domain names, websites are a lot like real estate.

 

Brent Cumberford is an online entrepreneur who’s made hundreds of thousands of dollars buying and selling websites.

 

“Just like houses and apartment buildings, online real estate comes down to ‘location, location, location,’” Cumberford told The Penny Hoarder.

 

He recommended buying .com website names instead of .org or .net. Once you have a good domain name in mind, buying it is simple. Go to a website hosting company like Namecheap or GoDaddy to see if your desired domain name is available.

 

Once you purchase it, you can reach out to potential businesses directly or use Flippa, a business marketplace, to find a buyer.

 

11. Get Paid to Watch TV

Among all the fun ways to make money, this one really takes the cake. You can actually get paid to watch TV.

 

For example, HowToWatch hires people to watch 100 hours of TV for $2,000. It requires some intense focus and note-taking, but hey, it’s money. For watching TV.

 

To snag this dream job, apply during an open application period. If you’re accepted, you’ll have about a month to binge on 100 hours of TV and keep a scorecard that tracks buffer speeds, load times and picture quality.

 

If that sounds like too much for you, the app Swagbucks also pays you to watch videos and TV from your smartphone. For each task completed, you’ll earn points, aka Swagbucks, which you can cash out for gift cards between $5 and $25.

 

12. Take Surveys

You really can make money doing online surveys. There are several legitimate paid survey sites out there to earn you some quick cash.

 

When you sign up for Swagbucks, you’ll earn an extra $5 toward a gift card if you complete a certain amount of surveys or tasks within 60 days.

 

InboxDollars is another paid survey site that could net you up to $5 per survey (though it’s usually closer to 50 cents).

 

13. Work on Mechanical Turk

Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform lets you complete small tasks online for a price.

 

According to Michael Naab, who wrote our guide (and a book) on making money with Mechanical Turk, you can expect to earn around $6 to $12 an hour doing Human Intelligence Tasks (HITs) on the platform. HITs range anywhere from completing surveys to Excel spreadsheet tasks to audio transcription.

 

14. Test Websites

Websites should be very user-friendly — so easy to use that an intoxicated person should be able to navigate it.

 

User experience consultant Richard Littauer took that idea very seriously. He started “The User Is Drunk,” a business where he tested people’s websites after drinking too much beer. And his idea took off.

 

“I raised my price for reviews from $50 to $500 very quickly,” Littauer told The Penny Hoarder, “hoping that people would stop buying so that I didn’t have to be drunk permanently.”

 

To get a steady stream of jobs, you may have to be creative like Littauer and build up your client base. For a shot at getting more assignments, sign up with websites like UserTesting and TryMyUI.

 

15. Be a Search Engine Evaluator

It’s scary how good Google’s search algorithm is becoming, but it’s not perfect… yet. Neither are other search engines, such as Yahoo or Bing.

 

To fix those flaws and make search results more relevant, companies like Appen and Lionbridge frequently hire search engine evaluators as independent contractors. Positions are typically part time, with hourly rates up to $15.

 

No previous experience is required — just tech savviness and a laptop or Android smartphone. For open positions, check Appen and Lionbridge’s career portal.

 

Using Your Home to Make Money

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Chris Zuppa/The Penny Hoarder.

Your home likely costs you a fair amount of money, so it’s time to enlist its help to earn that money back.

 

16. List a Room With Airbnb

Have a spare room? May as well try to earn some money by listing it on Airbnb

 

If you’re a good host with a desirable space, you could add hundreds — even thousands — of dollars to your savings account with Airbnb.

 

A few simple steps can make the difference between a great experience and a less-than-satisfactory one. We talked to Terence Michael, an Airbnb superhost based in Los Angeles.

 

Here are some of his tips:

 

Break out the labelmaker. “I have the entire house loaded with labels,” Michael says. “They look nice; they’re modern. This helps people feel less helpless.”

Be a good host and stock your place with the toiletries you’d expect at a hotel — toilet paper, soap and towels. Here’s a little hack from Michael: “I order on Amazon and have it delivered when people are there.”

Be kind to your neighbors. “I say, ‘I’m not going to put anyone here who I think won’t be good for you,’” Michael explains. “And I turn a lot of big groups away, especially in Nashville. I don’t want anyone going to the cops or the city.”

(Hosting laws vary from city to city. Please understand the rules and regulations applicable to your city and listing.)

 

17. Rent Your Yard for RV and Boat Storage

People need a place to put their boats and recreational vehicles during the off-season, which spells profit for you if you have the space. Your home insurance policy probably won’t cover damage, so you might have to add additional liability insurance (and check those local ordinances again).

 

Once your insurance is in shape, find a storage-space website and create a listing. While it’s possible to list your storage space on sites like Craigslist or on Facebook marketplaces, other alternatives are dedicated to RV or boat storage. One example is Neighbor.

 

Making a listing on Neighbor is free. You can set the rules and the price. Once you find a client, the agreed-upon amount will automatically be paid to you monthly (minus a 3% fee from the site). Regardless if the client misses a payment, Neighbor will pay out the full listing price.

 

It’s a win-win. You’ve got the space, and your neighbor won’t have to spend thousands of dollars on a storage facility.

 

18. Rent a Parking Spot

If you live in a large city or any town that occasionally hosts busy events, you can put out a sign and rent your driveway. Or you can rent out your parking space online using JustPark.

 

To register your parking space with JustPark, you must first create an account and answer questions about the spot. Is it a covered location? Can it fit only compact cars? Is it street parking or a driveway? Then you’re free to list your parking space as an “instant” spot (available right now) or take reservations whenever you’d like.

 

Writing Jobs

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Carmen Mandato/The Penny Hoarder

Are you a wordsmith? Put those writing skills to work to earn extra cash.

 

19. Get a Book Published

The publishing industry has changed. More than ever, a writer is expected to be the primary marketer of his or her books. That means the work isn’t over once you send the manuscript off to the presses (or inDesign). Now you have to promote it on social media and on book tours and earn solid book reviews.

 

That’s why most authors opt for ebooks and self-publishing through the Kindle Direct Publishing program, which is free. It’s possible to make money with your ebook even if you give it away.

 

Author Steve Gillman makes hundreds of dollars a month in passive income from his ebooks on Kindle Direct Publishing. In his guide to ebook publishing for The Penny Hoarder, he said it’s best to price your ebooks between $2.99 and $9.99.

 

Since Amazon gives you 70% royalties (which is good compared to publishing firms), it’s best to stick to a low price so most people can afford it.

 

20. Be a Copywriter or Editor

Content sites hire freelancers to write and edit articles. You have to work fast to make money on these sites, since you may earn less than 3 cents per word. Low pay aside, they are great for beginning freelancers to make some cash and get some experience.

 

In our list of the best freelance websites, which includes Upwork, Fiverr, Freelancer and Guru, we included several writer-focused sites that pay between $30 and $200 per article.

 

21. Write for Blogs

Blogs typically pay more than content sites. Many blogs pay $100 per post, but many writers are also trying to get those assignments.

 

Usually, blogs aren’t big businesses, and bloggers can’t afford Indeed listings, so it takes a little digging to find paying gigs.

 

Fortunately, several websites specialize in these types of jobs. Try these aggregators:

 

WriteJobs.info: a no-frills job listing site tailored for writers and editors. The free version is more than enough to snag a few clients, but a paid version is available if you donate $5 a month.

ProBlogger.com: a one-stop-shop for budding bloggers. Beyond listing a steady stream of jobs for writers, photographers and editors, ProBlogger has a ton of free resources for new writers, podcasts, ebooks and courses.

AllFreelanceWriting.com: a curated list of writing jobs that are paid directly from the client listed. Each job includes a pay rating from “LOW RATE” to “PRO RATE.”

As with all odd jobs, use your spidey sense when applying. Don’t do work for free or give sensitive information like your Social Security number up front.

 

22. Become an Affiliate Marketer

Affiliate marketing is simple in theory: Write emails, blog articles or comments that contain links to sponsored products, and when people use your coded link to visit and buy something, you make a commission.

 

Our sponsored posts at The Penny Hoarder are such examples of big-name affiliate marketing partnerships.

 

To get your feet wet, you can start making money as an affiliate partner at Amazon and earn up to 10% on e-commerce purchases that you linked to.

 

23. Write Slogans

Several websites will pay you to write slogans for companies. Some pay cash for each slogan (Freelancer and Fiverr, for example), while other sites host contests in which you can earn big bucks for the winning creation.

 

Slogan Slingers is one such site that’s completely free for copywriters to sign up and start writing slogans. Winning entries earn up to $999 (minus a 15% service fee) and are paid out via PayPal, which is required to register.

 

24. Get Paid to Write Greeting Cards

Some of the highest pay-per-word rates out there for writers aren’t in the New Yorker. They’re in the greeting-card industry.

 

Writing greeting cards could earn you hundreds of dollars for as little as five or ten words. But they have to be funny, clever or insightful, says Nicky Burton, founder of Calypso Cards.

 

“They really do have to be original,” Burton told The Penny Hoarder. “They have to have something fresh. We can’t keep going back to ‘gray hair’ and ‘over the hill.’”

 

To get started, you can pitch your ideas to Blue Mountain Arts or SNAFU designs. If they like your pitch, they’ll pay you $300 and $100 per idea, respectively.

 

So get writing, and be creative.

 

25. Enter Writing Contests

Many writing contests pay cash prizes. Some pay more than $1,000 for first place and also award a publishing contract. A few pay prizes of $5,000 to $10,000.

 

If you’re a poet, submit to Poetry Nook, which holds weekly contests that pay $50 for the winning poems. You can also submit to several magazines and publications for free if you want to get paid for creative writing.

 

26. Write Resumes (and Cover Letters)

Some people just hate writing, and they hate resume writing in particular. You can help them put their resumes together using free resume makers online. And after reading our guide on how to write a resume, you’ll be an expert.

 

Some people charge as little as $20 to do this, but others charge upwards of $800 a pop.

 

In 2014, Charmaine Pocek quit her day job to write resumes and cover letters on Fiverr. A couple years later, she became the first U.S. millionaire on the site.

 

When Pocek was starting out, she told The Penny Hoarder that she charged her clients as little as $5. Now she charges up to $800 for resume, cover-letter and LinkedIn profile services.

 

Since Pocek has the resume market on Fiverr cornered, you may want to give other resume-writing services a shot. Talent Inc. frequently hires resume writers. No professional experience is required to qualify, but you will need to be a master of Microsoft Word.

 

27. Write for Revenue-Sharing Sites

Among the websites that pay for articles, the revenue-sharing ones are the easiest to break into — sites like Dotdash, HubPages and ShoutMeLoud.

 

These sites don’t require you to be a well-renowned author per se. You can pen as many articles as you want, and if they generate revenue (aka clicks, views, sales or shares), you’ll get a part of it.

 

Some sites pay you 70% of what they make from your work, while others pay per view or comment. Either way, if nobody reads your article, you make nothing. But, hey, at least you still get a byline. If you’re a beginning freelance writer, those can really bolster your portfolio.

 

28. Write Reviews

If you have a website or blog, you could connect with companies willing to pay for product reviews. For example, at SocialSpark.com you can get paid to blog, tweet or post videos. To avoid selling false reviews, only accept assignments for products you actually love.

 

There are other ways to get paid for your opinions, too. Our guide to writing reviews on G2 Crowd could get you $50 or more to Amazon or Starbucks.rk.com you can get paid to blog, tweet or post videos. To avoid selling false reviews, only accept assignments for products you actually love.

 

There are other ways to get paid for your opinions, too. Our guide to writing reviews on G2 Crowd could get you $50 or more to Amazon or Starbucks.